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An introduction: I'm an ICU physician based in Brisbane, Australia, with interests in and ICU databases.

I'm currently doing my at The George Institute for Global Health, UNSW.

I'm particularly interested in clinical research in non-traditional, smaller, peripheral ICUs.

I have clinical interests in long term sequelae of critical illness among other things.

@LucillaPiccari @gpollara

Your “naivety as young researcher” 😂 made me think…
What if labs were “federated” in ressources ? Statisticians, ressources, equipment, data, etc all accessible to a “hub” of ressources for researchers.
This would certainly help cut cost between researchers or optimize ressources for public funded researchers. It could stimulate research & science 🤔

I’m kinda brainstorming here 😅

Musk revokes Twitter accounts for transit agencies, as they would compete against Tesla. Americans call this Free Markets.

octodon.social/@ethanz/1096839
ethanz@octodon.social - As Twitter suspends city services running on its infrastructure, maybe the question we should ask is "Why did we trust our services to privately owned platforms in the first place?" Excellent piece by @sarasholder@twitter.com of Bloomberg: bloomberg.com/news/articles/20

Still getting the hang of Mastodon. Hope to use it more in the new Year for conferences and .

In the meantime- Happy New Year, friends. 🥂

Who are the #epidemiologists and infectious disease #modellers on Mastodon?
I will update this list as I come across them and if you “favourite” or “boost” this toot you will be updated every time there is an addition.
With these you can create an “Epidemiology/Modellers” list on mastodon to browse their focused stream.

List so far:
@famulare
@enenbee
@aetiology
@DrZoeHyde
@dgbassani
@doxy_cycling
@adamjkucharski
@dgurdasani1
@epiellie

#epidemiology #epidemiologist #infectiousdisease

The looming COVID death toll in China is a massive failure of governance.

China could have had access to Western mRNA vaccines as early as 2021. They didn't get it, because they demanded that the vaccine manufacturers turn over the core production technology to them in order to get access to the Chinese market.

This is a common feature of Chinese industrial policy. If you want to sell your products there, you have to give them access to all the information Chinese companies would need to be able to knock off your products. In exchange for some money right now, you effectively train your own replacement. The polite euphemism for this is "technology transfer."

This demand was a huge problem for Pfizer and Moderna, because currently they're the only ones who know how to make mRNA vaccines, and it's generally accepted now that mRNA delivery is the future of vaccine development. Right now, they own that future.

(China's demand could have been sympathetic if they had been pushing Pfizer and Moderna to release this information into the public domain, which would have let anyone who wanted to use it. That, I could have gotten behind -- but that's not what they asked for. They wanted it to remain a monopoly. Just a monopoly that they could cut themselves in on.)

Both Pfizer and Moderna decided that the deal wasn't worth it, leaving China's citizens with only access to lower-performing, domestically produced vaccines. And so now a lot of people are going to die, unnecessarily.

The Chinese government decided that it was more important to try and get one more industrial advantage for itself than it was to use the time Zero COVID bought to get its people the best protection possible. It's not the only government that put business interests above its peoples' health -- that list is sadly quite long (and includes the United States). But it's disheartening every single time it happens.

reuters.com/business/healthcar

An overview of the ACCP training pathway in the UK:

sciencedirect.com/science/arti

We really need our colleges and professional bodies to look into this in Australia.

@EposVox As an addendum to this: most authors are not only genuinely delighted to share their work with you if you request it, some are even moreso delighted to talk to you about it and answer questions!

Especially if they have additional knowledge or information worth sharing that they didn't include in the original paper!

U.S. Police kill more than 1100 civilians annually—unprecedented in the developed world.

A new app called TurnSignl, built by Black civil rights lawyers, deescalates police interactions with civilians & get everyone home safe.

Here's how it works.
1. Download the app
2. When pulled over by police, face time a lawyer on demand via voice activation. The call is also auto recorded
3. The lawyer guides the convo.

Download TurnSignl here or gift it to a loved one for free: turnsignl.com/gift

If you’re going to leave Twitter, please don’t
a) delete your account, because someone bad will steal your handle
b) delete your Tweets, because their existence doesn’t help Elon and it’s like burning the Library of Alexandria.

Twitter captures a real-time historical record of a couple of decades and the billions of individuals’ snapshots are irreplaceable.

The thought of all those tweets being erased makes me feel physically sick.

[please pass on if you agree.]

#introduction Howdy, I'm Casey Briggs. For my job I'm a #data #journalist and presenter at ABC News. I live in Sydney but I grew up in Adelaide and I've also lived in Brisbane and Cairns.

I'm interested in #news and #currentaffairs, #culture. Sometimes I might also toot about #rstats #python #mathematics #science

New to mastodon?

Looking to find folks to follow?

Open the federated timeline and grab a few folks you fancy

@jopo_dr @maheshramanan single pathogen is here, especially for pulmonary infections. The host side is more complex, and will need more work but are not too far away. The issue is demonstrating they are needed, with both industry and research funders unwilling to invest in the technology until benefit is demonstrated- chicken and egg

@maheshramanan @jopo_dr question is what one is looking for. Direct impact on short-term mortality of a specific mechanism is important, but may not modulate the longer term effects of critical illness. Depending on cost, risk and benefit will influence choices to use therapy. As an example I routinely use hydrocortisone for shock, not because it will alter mortality but because it shortens shock apparently safely and allows patients to come off organ support faster, it’s cheap and low harm.

@Mozza @maheshramanan what I’m wondering, at the moment in trials in general, is what’s the 28 day mortality endpoint and what evidence is there for it? I can imagine hyper inflammatory modes of icu death are revealed in 7-10 days and then something like ESRF will take weeks to unmask if fibrosis etc. not unique to this drug but wondering about endpoints for trials in general! So hard with syndromic organ failures as not all the same!

@Mozza @maheshramanan I do dream of near patient subtyping! Some kind of INR for the inflamm cytokines would be dreamy!

@maheshramanan @jopo_dr I think there is a strong case for that- though we must remember‘inclusion criteria’ are already designed to enrich. Post Covid we are seeing more single pathogen studies (e.g. REMAP-CAP flu study) which is again enrichment. But we need a revolution in near-patient diagnostics for stratification and enrichment of trial populations.

@maheshramanan here - phase 3 stopped for primary endpoint futility which was mortality at 28 days - but renal parameters improved markedly. I’m wondering, probably naievely, if the component it reduces is the CkD pathophysiology?

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